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Where the Horses Sing

WhereTheHorsesSingThis Article and Photo by Bear Guerra courtesy of Emergence Magazine

Where the Horses Sing
by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee
“If we are to become partners with the Earth, living our shared journey, we have to once again speak the same language, listen with our senses attuned not just to the physical world but also to its inner dimension.”
Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee is a writer and Sufi teacher whose work focuses on spiritual responsibility in our present time of transition. In this essay, Llewellyn witnesses a growing wasteland that parallels our increasing detachment from the reality that spirit and matter are united.

Recalling the deep knowledge of land and water that was once interwoven into the lives of all of our ancestors—and the ways in which Western civilization has marginalized those who continue to maintain this deep relationship—he seeks the threshold that could bring us back to the place where the land sings: to a deep ecology of consciousness that returns our awareness to a fully animate world.
OPEN ESSAY

Climate Solutions 101

Presented by Project Drawdown

New Online Course

Presented by Project Drawdown, this six-unit video series is filled with the latest need-to-know science and fascinating insights from global thought leaders. Free, full of hope, and streaming now.

Watch Now

https://drawdown.org/climate-solutions-101

Your climate solutions journey begins now. Filled with the latest need-to-know science and fascinating insights from global leaders in climate policy, research, investment, and beyond, this video series is a brain-shift toward a brighter climate reality.

Climate Solutions 101 is the world’s first major educational effort focused solely on solutions. Rather than rehashing well-known climate challenges, Project Drawdown centers game-changing climate action based on its own rigorous scientific research and analysis. This course, presented in video units and in-depth conversations, combines Project Drawdown’s trusted resources with the expertise of several inspiring voices from around the world. Climate solutions become attainable with increased access to free, science-based educational resources, elevated public discourse, and tangible examples of real-world action. Continue your climate solutions journey, today.

The Need To Grow – Special Screening

Special March 2021 Event:

Can we feed the world without destroying the planet? That depends – on what we do NOW.

Join us for this FREE screening of Conscious Earth Films’ award-winning documentary:

The Need to Grow  –  

by Zoom on Sunday, March 21, 2021, from 1:00-3:00 pm.

Here is the Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83446772362?pwd=Rk9kdHJyeDRxTlJONWZlWEgvS2w5Zz09

History Shows That Sustained, Disruptive Protests Work

Courtesy of Yes! Magazine

Kevin A. Young

Kevin A. Young teaches history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He is a co-author, with Tarun Banerjee and Michael Schwartz, of Levers of Power: How the 1% Rules and What the 99% Can Do About It (Verso, July 2020).

Protesters march against racism and police brutality in Amityville, New York, on July 5, 2020. Photo by Thomas A. Ferrara / Newsday RM / Getty Images

All disruptive social movements are met with stern warnings from people who think they know better. The current movement to “Defund the Police” is no exception.

Thus an editor of the Detroit Free Press professes sympathy for the protesters’ aims but says their “awful slogan” is “alienating” to the public, including to “White people who feel more reassured than threatened” by the police. Other pundits insist that “activists who are demanding radical change” are paving the way for Trump’s reelection: “Defund the Police” is “music to Trump’s ears” because it baits the Democrats into endorsing this presumably unpopular demand.

These critics share an assumption about how change happens: Movements must win over the majority of the public; once they do so, that sentiment soon finds its way into policy changes.  

This argument has several problems. One is that government so frequently disobeys the will of the majority. Statistical analyses that compare public preferences and policy find that the opinions of non-wealthy people “have little or no independent influence on policy.” Having the support of the majority is no guarantee of change, to say the least.

Also problematic is the assumption that radical demands or actions scare away the public. The empirical evidence is mixed, but the 54% support for the recent burning of the Minneapolis police precinct should make us skeptical of conventional wisdom.

But the biggest problem with the We-Must-Persuade-the-Majority argument is that most progressive victories in U.S. history did not enjoy majority support when they were won. In case after case, a radical minority disrupted the functioning of businesses and state institutions, which sought to restore stability by granting concessions and ordering politicians to do the same.

Read the rest of this interesting and illuminating article here.

Other Side of the Hill

Free Zoom Screening of New Film on Rural Oregon Renewable Energy Initiatives

“Other Side of the Hill” shows how rural communities in Eastern Oregon are reaping economic rewards now by transcending the toxic partisan rhetoric of climate change

On Thursday, October 29, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m., the SOCAN-Ashland Climate Action Project will host a free private Zoom screening of “Other Side of the Hill,” a new film about renewable energy initiatives underway in Eastern Oregon. The film is presented in partnership with Ashland Works, Climate Reality Project-Southwestern Oregon Chapter, McCloud Watershed Council, Pollinator Project Rogue Valley, Rogue Community College Earth Club, Southern Oregon Pachamama Alliance, Sustainable Rogue Valley, and Sustainability at Southern Oregon University.  

Directed by James Parker and Juliet Grable of Synchronous Pictures and Executive Produced by local and regional climate activists Julian Bell, Deb Evans, Ron Schaaf, and Tom Bowerman, “Other Side of the Hill”  explores the impacts of a changing climate in rural Eastern Oregon as seen through the eyes of local leaders on the ground. From innovative timber operations in Wallowa County to large scale solar in Lakeview, the film amplifies the voices of rural communities often left unheard. In a time of cultural divide between rural and urban Oregon–and toxic partisan politics around climate action–it’s inspiring to learn about communities that have found common ground in an urgency to address a changing landscape.  

The 30-minute film will be followed by Q&A with the filmmakers, visionaries, and “stars,” as well as leaders in Rogue Valley renewable energy initiatives. 

You must RSVP to attend. To join us, email carmen@socan.eco.  

Attendance is limited–RSVP now!

Trailer | Film website | Film Facebook page

Heal the Trauma of 2020

Saturday, October 10, 2020 – 10:30 AM

Let’s Begin to Heal the Trauma of 2020: You are invited to a Zoom meeting with the UU Trauma Response Ministry on Saturday, Oct 10, 2020 at 10:30 am Pacific

Please join members of the UU Trauma Ministry Team and other members and friends of the Southern Oregon UU Partnership (including UU Fellowship of Klamath County, UUs of Grants Pass and Rogue Valley UU Fellowship) on Saturday, October 10 @ 10:30 am via ZOOM for an opportunity to explore the ways in which the recent wildfires have been and are affecting each of us and how we can support each other and those around us during this important time.

Many of us have experienced trauma upon trauma this year, with COVID-19 and the intensity of our national political divides exacerbating the pain of watching wildfire sweep through our region. Whether or not you feel you personally experienced trauma this year, your supportive presence can help our community begin to heal. Board Co-Chair Constance and Intern Minister Alison have been spearheading this project for the SOUUP community, because both of us have experienced finding healing we didn’t even know we needed at this type of event. We hope you’ll consider joining in.

You must register in advance for this meeting!
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

The UU Trauma Response Ministry was established in 2002 and has for the past 18 years worked with congregations across the country who have faced a variety of difficult and tragic circumstances including wildfires in southern California, Hurricanes Charlie, Katrina and Maria; the shootings at Tennessee Valley UU Church as well as many other incidents of natural and human made disaster and trauma. Those who have benefited in the past from the presence of UUTRM report that their work helped greatly, especially through the initial stages of their experiences. Even those participants who didn’t personally feel as though they needed to talk found that their presence was helpful for others who did. Please join us for this important conversation.

Question? Email Intern Minister Alison: intern.minister@rvuuf.org..

SRV’s Black Lives Matter Statement

Sustainable Rogue Valley affirms and supports Black Lives Matter.

We stand in solidarity with all people working for racial justice.

We believe that environmental and economic sustainability are inextricably linked with racial justice.

We shall educate ourselves, confront our own racism, and dedicate ourselves to undoing all patterns of discrimination.

We shall act courageously to dismantle white supremacy so that we can contribute to a better world for the generations that follow us.

Next SRV meeting this weekend Sunday 9/13 at 12:30


Save the Pipe Fork forest

Dear Sustainable Rogue Valley,

     We are meeting by Zoom this weekend Sunday, September 13 at 12:30 pm. You can click on the link in the invitation pasted below or use the meeting ID.

     I have been thinking a lot about racism, the environment and solidarity lately, and the attached agenda contains a proposed statement for our web site. This six-minute video provides a good perspective on the connection between environmental and social justice. If you have feedback about the proposed statement and cannot attend the meeting, please send your feedback to me by email.
     An agenda for the meeting is attached, along with minutes from our last meeting. Please let me know if you have items that you would like me to add to the agenda.
     We had a rich conversation last month, and I look forward to connecting on Sunday. Please join us!

Dorothy

Sustainable Rogue Valley is a group of southern Oregonians who have come together to foster a vibrant and resilient community that makes use of sustainable practices, empowers us to share our skills and gifts, and confronts environmental and economic instability with determination to create a better life for all.

Dorothy Swain is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Sustainable Rogue Valley
Time: Sep 13, 2020 12:30 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
https://roguecc.zoom.us/j/93761185026

Meeting ID: 937 6118 5026
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Meeting ID: 937 6118 5026
Find your local number: https://roguecc.zoom.us/u/abTcXL69di

10 Steps for Rebalancing our World in Times of Crisis


Donnie Maclurcan
Mar 15

The coronavirus outbreak makes one thing abundantly clear: we’re interconnected and in this together.

Yet our greatest vulnerability comes from a system in which money, resources, and power have accumulated for far too long.

For those in positions of privilege, here are 10 steps you can take to restore the circulation that all living systems need in order to thrive:

1. Be outstandingly generous to those disproportionately impacted. Consider your privilege and actively support communities that don’t generally have an accumulation of resources, are discriminated against, or are overlooked: the elderly, sick or infirmed; healthcare workers; single parents; undocumented, underemployed, self-employed, contract, gig, low-wage or laid-off workers; Black, Indigenous and People of Color; immigrants; the homeless and displaced; incarcerated or formerly incarcerated individuals; veterans; people with disability; and LGBTQ+ populations. This helps people understand who is most affected, helps us allocate resources more efficiently and helps to right systemic wrongs. (See here how the coronavirus outbreak affects Black people disproportionately)

2. Reduce rents for tenants and small businesses. Don’t evict. Delay rental payments. Rent vacant properties. This allows everyone to maintain homes and businesses through challenging times. (See here how this landlord is offering financial relief)

3. Freeze or cancel loan and bill repayments from individuals and small businesses. At a minimum, put a hold on accruing interest or penalties, and extend loan and bill repayment dates. Offer no-collateral, zero-interest or depreciating loans to individuals, small businesses, and nonprofit enterprises in need. This ensures that we don’t penalize people and businesses because of unforeseen circumstances. (See here how the U.S. administration has temporarily halted interest payments on federally-held student loans)

4. Support your employees and teams. Provide or advocate for: remote working opportunities (where possible); childcare support; paid sick leave; flextime; early and unplanned bonuses; and an employment guarantee for the coming months. Reduce the top-to-bottom salary ratio. Reject racism and have extra patience with inefficiencies, mistakes, stress and tension with your employees and colleagues. This provides people with security and a better ability to cope with work and family demands. (See here how this company is shutting down its stores but continuing to pay all its employees)

5. Keep your money local. Purchase from nearby businesses, especially those smaller in size. Tip generously. Purchase gift cards and pre-pay for future services. Support people whose activities and events have been cancelled — through online purchases, subscriptions and patronage. Decline refunds or donate refunded money to an associated cause. Move your personal and company’s money to a local credit union or community bank. This keeps money moving within our communities, and services operational. (See here for comprehensive data on why doing business locally matters)

6. Increase your charitable giving. Offer before people ask. Provide support to individuals, families and frontline social services, as well as those working to create a more equitable and resilient economic system. If you benefit from investment fluctuations, use the gains to finance your generosity, and donate stock to nonprofits. This reduces the likelihood of people falling through the cracks. (See here how some leaders are ramping up their giving right now)

7. Volunteer virtually and in-person (where safe). Offer online support to nonprofits and check in via phone or social media with people who might feel particularly alone. Where social distancing is possible, volunteer at your local food bank, shelter or other frontline service provider and pick up shopping, post mail, or offer childcare for people in need. Donate blood (if you’re healthy). This gives everyone an opportunity to take action. (See here for hundreds of virtual volunteering opportunities)

8. Share spare resources. Make an inventory of your supplies and a timeline for distributing what you’re willing to share. Drop off food, essential items, high-end healthcare products, and gift cards to individuals, your local food bank, meal delivery groups and other supportive services. Share excess produce from your land and provide access to your yard or property for a community garden to emerge. This ensures there is enough for everyone, and that resources aren’t idle. (See here how hundreds of Mutual Aid Networks are mobilizing in response to the coronavirus)

9. Support aligned programs and legislative proposals. Champion programs and laws that support tenants, small businesses, workers, and nonprofits, while prioritizing assistance for: the elderly, sick or infirmed; healthcare workers; single parents; undocumented, underemployed, self-employed, contract, gig, low-wage or laid-off workers; Black, Indigenous and People of Color; immigrants; the homeless and displaced; incarcerated or formerly incarcerated individuals; veterans; people with disability; and LGBTQ+ populations. This helps reinforce the structural changes our system needs. (See here how Twitter has banned hateful speech around age, disability and disease)

10. Lead by example. Inspire others with privilege to follow you. This creates a snowball effect. (See here how this woman’s coronavirus campaign is inspiring #viralkindness)

With thanks to the following people, from around the world, who helped crowd-edit this article: Dien Vo, Natalie Holmes, Crystal Arnold, Katia Sol, Tía Laída Fé, Victoria Saint, Claire Sommer, J’aime Powell, Alexa Bernard, Bonnie Cohen, and Kokayi Nosakhere.