From the 2019 Bioneers Conference going on now…

Day 2

Today, the second day of the 2019 Bioneers Conference, was dually concentrated on climate solutions and justifiable climate despair (among many, many other ideas discussed throughout the day). Bioneers reminded us that we live in a moment of great unknowing as we face a climate future that’s unlike anything humanity has previously faced. But now is the time to harness our bravery, as Valarie Kaur observed by poignantly comparing the future we face to giving birth:

“What if the darkness in our world right now is not the darkness of the tomb but the darkness of the womb? What if our America is not dead but a country still waiting to be born? What if all of our ancestors who pushed through the fire before us, who survived genocide and colonization and slavery and assault, are standing behind us now whispering in our ears ‘You are brave’? What if this is our time of great transition?”

Following are some of the ideas and takeaways Bioneers introduced today:

ACTION ITEMS — Turn Inspiration Into Real Change

Lessons and Takeaways:

  • Women and mothers – step up to lead: Moms Clean Air Force‘s Heather McTeer Toney reminded us, “Mothers are realizing that our voices are required at this moment. It’s not an option, it’s a requirement. We belong in these rooms. Anyone who has an interest in seeing the welfare of our children through the impact of climate change belongs in these places.”
  • Empower young people and get them outside: Many speakers today mentioned a perceived hopelessness among young people in the face of existential crises. Proposed solutions included fostering closer relationships with the Earth and inviting them into the fold as we work toward climate solutions. We’re going to need everybody in this effort, said Brett KenCairn.
  • Get your money out of investments that fund pollution and destruction (divest): “Shell announced this past year that divestment had become a material risk to its business,” said author and 350.org Co-Founder Bill McKibben. Examine your investments and urge institutions to do the same. (And cut up your Chase Bank credit card.)
  • Love with these three practices: From Valarie Kaur, we must “see no stranger, tend the wound, and breathe & push.”
  • Learn about climate solutions, then share them in ways that resonate with real people: The Project Drawdown website has published its list of solutions. Heather McTeer Toney and Paul Hawken reminded us to speak in a language that your audience will absorb. “Mitigation?” Hawken said in reference to how the media covers the climate change. “Who wakes up in the morning and thinks ‘I can’t wait to go mitigate today’?” (Read an excerpt from Drawdown here.)
  • In conversations about climate resiliency, don’t just invite Indigenous People to the table: Put them at the head of the table. Panelists in this afternoon’s “Building Resilience in a Climate-Changed World” noted that Indigenous leaders have inherited ancestral knowledge that makes them especially valuable in these conversations. Listen up.
  • Tell us your stories: Are there stories Bioneers should be telling? Do you have feedback for us? Reach out! Email stories@bioneers.org or call 877.BIONEER.

Campaigns to Follow and Support:

  • Moms Clean Air Force (introduced by Heather McTeer Toney)
    • Mission: “Our mission is to protect children from air pollution and climate change. We envision a safe, stable future where all children breathe clean air.”
  • The Revolutionary Love Project (introduced by Valarie Kaur)
    • Mission: “We produce stories, tools, curricula, conferences, films, TV moments, and mass mobilizations that equip and inspire people to practice the ethic of love. Our current projects focus on racism, nationalism, and hate against Sikh, Muslim, Arab, and South Asian American communities.”
  • 350.org (introduced by Bill McKibben)
    • Mission: “We’re an international movement of ordinary people working to end the age of fossil fuels and build a world of community-led renewable energy for all.”
  • Project Drawdown (introduced by Paul Hawken)
    • Mission: “Project Drawdown is helping the world stop global warming by achieving Drawdown — as quickly, safely, and equitably as possible.”
  • SFEI Aquatic Science Center (introduced by Felicia Marcus)
    • Mission: “As sea levels continue to rise, communities will need to adapt the San Francisco Bay shoreline to create greater social, economic, and ecological resilience. A critical tool for this process is a science-based framework for developing adaptation strategies that are appropriate for the diverse shoreline of the Bay and that take advantage of natural processes. This project proposes such a framework.”
  • American Indian Child Resource Center (introduced by Erica Persons)
    • Mission: “The American Indian Child Resource Center is a non-profit social services and educational community-based organization serving American Indian community members from across the greater Oakland/San Francisco Bay Area and surrounding counties.”
  • Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (introduced by Osprey Orielle Lake)
    • Mission: “The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International is a solutions-based, multi-faceted organization established to engage women worldwide in policy advocacy, on-the-ground projects, direct action, trainings, and movement building for global climate justice.”

Earth Activists Support Group

Sustainable Rogue Valley presents

Support Group for Earth Activists

Saturday, October 26, 2019   1:30 – 3 pm

Unitarian Universalist Hall,
129 NW ‘E’ Street, Grants Pass, 97526

 

  • Potluck snacks are encouraged
  • Please bring your utensils

Activism is hard work. It can lead to burnout, feelings of isolation, frustration and discouragement, as well as many other feelings. Some of us were inspired by an Awakening the Dreamer seminar recently and decided to hold this support group and invite other activists as well.

This gathering will be a safe space for people involved in earth activism of all kinds to gather and give and receive support, talk about issues they face as activists, ask for help and give help to others. It won’t be a forum for debate, but rather a place where we can gain strength from being together.

info@sevengenerations.org

“We are stronger together”

“Building Transformational Resilience for Climate Change Traumas and Toxic Stresses”

ACEsConnection

An event hosted by ACE’s Connection

You are invited to watch the webinar together at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall, 129 NW E Street, Grants Pass, OR – to share the learning.

September 10, 2019 11:00 am

You can sign up now here. Copy/paste this into your browser: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_VcuqXdZJTp-HeD5PLJQrIQ

You will learn:

• how climate change creates personal, family, and community traumas and toxic stresses;
• how those traumatic stressors trigger feedbacks that expand and aggravate ACEs and many other person, social, community, and societal maladies;
• why current approaches are woefully inadequate to address what is already occurring and rapidly steaming toward us and why prevention is the only realistic solution;
• the framework for prevention we call Transformational Resilience that includes resilience education and skills-development focused on both Presencing and Purposing skills.


Speakers:
Bob Doppelt, Executive Director, The Resource Innovation Group, and Founder and Coordinator of the International Transformational Resilience Coalition (ITRC).

The International Transformational Resilience Coalition (ITRC) is a network of over 400 mental health, social service, social justice, climate, emergency response, faith, and other professionals working to prevent harmful personal, family, community, and societal maladies resulting from climate change generated traumas and toxic stresses by ensuring that every adult and child in the U.S. and worldwide learns preventative Presencing (self-regulation) and Purposing (adversity-based growth) information and skills.

Please submit any questions to: alison.cebulla.aces@gmail.com

ACES Trainings & Workshop and Southern Oregon Success Updates

OPEN ACES TRAININGS AND OPEN WORKSHOP IN SELF-REGULATION & RESILIENCE COMING UP IN MEDFORD

The Southern Oregon ACEs Training Team is offering ACEs sessions for all comers on Tuesday, July 23 and Wednesday, August 14, from 1 pm to 3 pm at the SOESD, 101 North Grape Street in Medford, as well as a workshop in Self-Regulation & Resilience on Tuesday, July 30, from 1 pm to 2:30 pm at the same location. Thanks to funding by our partner organizations, there is no cost for these sessions. Members of all agencies and the general public are welcome.

The ACEs training focuses on the science of N.E.A.R. (Neurobiology, Epigenetics, Adverse Childhood Experiences and Resilience), providing vital information on the impact of trauma on development as well as the core protective systems of resilience

The Self-Regulation & Resilience workshop offers a review of the N.E.A.R. curriculum (Neurobiology, Epigenetics, ACEs and Resilience) covered in the team’s ongoing ACEs trainings then moves to a focus on specific tools for self-regulation and resilience.

For the ACEs training session on July 23, please register here.

For the ACEs training session on August 14, please register here.

For the workshop in Self-Regulation & Resilience, please register here.

To schedule a training session or workshop for any group, or for more information, contact peter_buckley@southernoregonsuccess.org.

COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN ANNOUNCED

An unprecedented collaboration led by the Jefferson Regional Health Alliance has resulted in the publication of the 2019-2022 Community Health Improvement Plan for Jackson and Josephine Counties, titled “All In For Health.”

For the first time, our region’s hospitals (Asante and Providence), Coordinated Care Organizations (AllCare, PrimaryHealth and Jackson Care Connect) and federally qualified health clinics (La Clinica, Siskiyou Community Health Center and Rogue Community Health) joined together with the Addictions Recovery Center, OnTrack, ColumbiaCare Services, Kairos, Options for Southern Oregon, OSU Extension Service, the VA Southern Oregon Rehabilitation Center & Clinics, Jackson County Public Health & Mental Health, Josephine County Public Health and the Rogue Valley Council of Governments to go through their mandated Community Health Assessment (CHA), which has now resulted in a region-wide Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP).

The process has included hundreds of people in health care, human services and the community at large. From all the data collected, all the focus group discussions and surveys completed, the plan that has evolved sets three prioritized areas of need: Behavior Health & Well-Being (mental health and substance use), Housing for All (safe, affordable, appropriate housing) and Families Matter (parenting support and life skills).

To read the proposed strategies and approaches for progress in these three areas, you can find the Community Health Improvement Plan, “All In For Health,” at the Jefferson Regional Health Alliance website.

HEARTS WITH A MISSION LEADS “SAFE FAMILIES FOR CHILDREN” PROGRAM

Hearts with a Mission, a remarkable local organization serving children and youth, is working with the Department of Human Services to administer and coordinate an innovative program for families in crisis, Safe Families For Children.

Kevin Lamson, Executive Director for Hearts With A Mission, explained that his organization has been implementing the Safe Families For Children program in Jackson County since 2014.  “We brought the program with us to Josephine County in 2016 and opened a Hub for Safe Families in Lincoln County in January of 2019,” Lamson said.

As described by DHS, the Safe Families program provides opportunities for families to access supportive resources including host families for caregivers who may be experiencing crisis and are in need of a safe place for their children to stay temporarily.

Host families create an extended family-like support through a community of devoted volunteers who are motivated by compassion to keep kids safe and families intact. The primary purpose of a host family is to support those who are currently, potentially or at risk of becoming involved with Child Welfare.

Hearts With A Mission is working with faith-based organizations to recruit host families and support groups, and to ensure each family in the program has a family coach as well.

“This is something Oregon is leading the country in–attempting to prevent foster care through SFFC, which recently was confirmed an evidenced-based program,” Lamson noted.

For additional information about Safe Families, check out the videos below. To get more information about how Hearts With A Mission is working with the program locally, or to volunteer to help, contact Heather Siewell at heather.s@heartswithamission.org.

 

CASA NEEDS VOLUNTEERS TO HELP CHILDREN

CASA of Jackson County, founded in 1990, is a non-profit organization responsible for recruiting, training and supporting the work of CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) volunteers.  CASAs advocate for abused and neglected children by making recommendations to the court regarding the immediate and future needs of the children in the care of Child Welfare.

Volunteer CASAs are the voice of the child in court and are generally the only consistent person to follow each child’s case to completion. To be a CASA, you must be at least 21 years of age, have a heart for children, be able to attend meetings and court hearings, maintain objectivity, and always speak to the child’s best interest.

We need more CASAs to advocate for the 200 children currently waiting for a CASA. To learn more, attend an hour-long orientation on any Thursday at 12:00pm at the CASA office, 409 Front St., Medford. No appointment necessary, just drop in. For additional information, call 541-734-2272.

 

SHERIFF’S ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOCUSES ON ADDICTION RECOVERY AND MENTAL HEALTH

A community advisory committee on the proposal to build a new jail facility in Jackson County has been convened by Sheriff Nathan Sickler. The committee, made up of local government officials, public safety personnel, mental health advocates, addiction recovery specialists and other community members, met for the first time on July 8 to review data on jail bookings, learn more about current support services, and discuss the impacts of addiction on individuals, families and the community.

Additional meetings are being planned for the next few months to discuss mental health issues, existing and potential new programs to divert people away from jail, and ideas for the design for a facility that can prioritize public safety while also offering paths to health, recovery and good citizenship.

(Notes by Southern Oregon Success Program Manager Peter Buckley)

To schedule a training session or workshop for any group, or for more information, contact peter_buckley@southernoregonsuccess.org.

JOIN US ON FACEBOOK

The Facebook page for Southern Oregon Success features almost daily postings of events taking place in our region and information shared from all over as part of our learning community efforts on what works and what doesn’t in helping kids and families thrive.

If you do Facebook, check us out and Like us at Southern Oregon Success.

Sustainable Rogue Valley presents

Support Group for Earth Activists

Saturday, June 22, 2019   1 – 3 pm

Unitarian Universalist Hall,
129 NW ‘E’ Street, Grants Pass, 97526
  • Potluck snacks are encouraged
  • Please bring your utensils

Activism is hard work. It can lead to burnout, feelings of isolation, frustration and discouragement, as well as many other feelings. Some of us were inspired by an Awakening the Dreamer seminar recently and decided to hold this support group and invite other activists as well.

This gathering will be a safe space for people involved in earth activism of all kinds to gather and give and receive support, talk about issues they face as activists, ask for help and give help to others. It won’t be a forum for debate, but rather a place where we can gain strength from being together.

info@sevengenerations.org

“We are stronger together”

The 3.5% Rule: How a Small Minority Can Change the World

Nonviolent protests are twice as likely to succeed as armed conflicts – and those engaging a threshold of 3.5% of the population have never failed to bring about change.

In 1986, millions of Filipinos took to the streets of Manila in peaceful protest and prayer in the People Power movement. The Marcos regime folded on the fourth day.

In 2003, the people of Georgia ousted Eduard Shevardnadze through the bloodless Rose Revolution, in which protestors stormed the parliament building holding the flowers in their hands.

Earlier this year, the presidents of Sudan and Algeria both announced they would step aside after decades in office, thanks to peaceful campaigns of resistance.

In each case, civil resistance by ordinary members of the public trumped the political elite to achieve radical change.

To read the article from the BBC:

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20190513-it-only-takes-35-of-people-to-change-the-world?utm_source=pocket-newtab

 

Public Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES) Presentation


N GRANTS PASS:

Public Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES) Presentation

Dinner and Childcare provided (ages 3 to 10)

     The Grants Pass School District is pleased to invite the Grants Pass community to public presentations on the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study, or ACES for short. This 90 minute presentation will cover what the study was, what we now know about the amazing ways we as humans adapt to our world, why ACES play a significant role in the quality of our health as adults, and most importantly, what we can do together to reduce adversity in our community and improve our overall health and quality of life.

     We will serve a pizza dinner at 5:30 pm to everyone who can come. We will also be providing childcare for ages 3 to 10. We encourage you to bring your children to dinner. After dinner, our Grants Pass high school leadership students will be providing childcare for you. While they play, you can come to the presentation to learn about ACES, how it impacts most of us, and how we can become resilient through our adversity. The presentation will begin at 6 pm.

     Interested? Click here and let us know you are coming. You will get a confirmation email when you register for the event. No email? No problem. Give us a call at (541) 474-5715 (press 1 at the voice message).

Date and Location:

May 6 at Riverside Elementary (1200 SE Harvey Drive, Grants Pass, OR 97526)

These presentations are open to the public.

Todd Bloomquist
tbloomquist@grantspass.k12.or.us
541-474-5715

A Nation of Weavers

An excellent article on the importance of building “radical mutuality”, by David Brooks:

The social renaissance is happening from the ground up.

David Brooks

By David Brooks

Opinion Columnist

Photo by Gabriela Bhaskar for The New York TimesGabriela Bhaskar for The New York Times

I start with the pain. A couple times a week I give a speech somewhere in the country about social isolation and social fragmentation. Very often a parent comes up to me afterward and says, “My daughter took her life when she was 14.” Or, “My son died of an overdose when he was 20.”

Their eyes flood with tears. I don’t know what to say. I squeeze a shoulder just to try to be present with them, but the crying does not stop. As it turns to weeping they rush out of the auditorium and I am left with my own futility. What can I say to these parents? What can I say to the parents still around who don’t yet know they may soon become those parents?

This kind of pain is an epidemic in our society. When you cover the sociology beat as I do, you see other kinds of pain. The African-American woman in Greenville who is indignant because young black kids in her neighborhood face injustice just as gross as she did in 1953. The college student in the Midwest who is convinced that she is the only one haunted by compulsive thoughts about her own worthlessness. The Trump-supporting small-business man in Louisiana who silently clenches his fists in rage as guests at a dinner party disparage his whole way of life.

These different kinds of pain share a common thread: our lack of healthy connection to each other, our inability to see the full dignity of each other, and the resulting culture of fear, distrust, tribalism, shaming and strife.

On Dec. 7, 1941, countless Americans saw that their nation was in peril and walked into recruiting stations. We don’t have anything as dramatic as Pearl Harbor, but when 47,000 Americans kill themselves every year and 72,000 more die from drug addiction, isn’t that a silent Pearl Harbor? When the basic norms of decency, civility and truthfulness are under threat, isn’t that a silent Pearl Harbor? Aren’t we all called at moments like these to do something extra?

My something extra was starting something nine months ago at the Aspen Institute called Weave: The Social Fabric Project. The first core idea was that social isolation is the problem underlying a lot of our other problems. The second idea was that this problem is being solved by people around the country, at the local level, who are building community and weaving the social fabric. How can we learn from their example and nationalize their effect?

We traveled around the country and found them everywhere. We’d plop into big cities like Houston and small towns like Wilkesboro, N.C., and we’d find 25 to 100 community “Weavers” almost immediately. This is a movement that doesn’t know it’s a movement.

Some of them work at organizations: a vet who helps other mentally ill vets in New Orleans; a guy who runs a boxing gym in Appalachian Ohio where he nominally teaches young men boxing, but really teaches them life; a woman who was in the process of leaving the Englewood neighborhood in Chicago when she saw two little girls playing with broken bottles in the empty lot across the street. She turned to her husband and said: We’re not moving away from that. We’re not going to be just another family that abandoned this place.

Many others do their weaving in the course of everyday life — because that’s what neighbors do. One lady in Florida said she doesn’t have time to volunteer, but that’s because she spends 40 hours a week looking out for local kids and visiting sick folks in the hospital. We go into neighborhoods and ask, “Who is trusted here?” In one neighborhood it was the guy who collects the fees at the parking garage.

We’re living with the excesses of 60 years of hyperindividualism. There’s a lot of emphasis in our culture on personal freedom, self-interest, self-expression, the idea that life is an individual journey toward personal fulfillment. You do you. But Weavers share an ethos that puts relationship over self. We are born into relationships, and the measure of our life is in the quality of our relationships. We precedes me.

Whether they live in red or blue America, they often use the same terms and embody the same values — deep hospitality, showing up for people and keep showing up. They are somewheres, not anywheres — firmly planted in their local community. I met one guy in Ohio who began his work by standing in the town square with a sign: “Defend Youngstown.”

The phrase we heard most was “the whole person.” Whether you are a teacher, a nurse or a neighbor, you have to see and touch the whole person — the trauma, the insecurities and the dreams as much as the body and the brain.

But the trait that leaps out above all others is “radical mutuality”: We are all completely equal, regardless of where society ranks us. “I am broken; I need others to survive,” an afterschool program leader in Houston told us. “We don’t do things for people. We don’t do things to people. We do things with people,” said a woman who builds community for teenagers in New Orleans.

Being around these people has been one of the most uplifting experiences of my life. Obviously, it’s made me want to be more neighborly, to be more active and intentional in how I extend care.

But it has also changed my moral lens. I’ve become so impatient with the politicians I cover! They are so self-absorbed! Social scientists tell us that selfishness is natural, people are motivated by money, power and status. But Weavers are not motivated by any of these things. They want to live in right relation with others and to serve the community good.

Their example has shown me that we don’t just have a sociological problem; we have a moral problem. We all create a shared moral ecology through the daily decisions of our lives. When we stereotype, abuse, impugn motives and lie about each other, we’ve ripped the social fabric and encouraged more ugliness. When we love across boundaries, listen patiently, see deeply and make someone feel known, we’ve woven it and reinforced generosity. As Charles Péguy said, “The revolution is moral or not at all.”
Get a more personal, less conventional take on political developments, newsmakers, cultural milestones and more with Frank Bruni’s exclusive commentary every week.

So the big question is: How do we take the success the Weavers are having on the local level and make it national? The Weavers are building relationships one by one, which takes time. Relationships do not scale.

But norms scale. If you can change the culture, you can change behavior on a large scale. If you can change the lens through which people see the world, as these Weavers have changed mine, then you can change the way people want to be in the world and act in the world. So that’s our job. To shift the culture so that it emphasizes individualism less and relationalism more.

Culture changes when a small group of people, often on the margins of society, find a better way to live, and other people begin to copy them. These Weavers have found a better way to live. We at Weave — and all of us — need to illuminate their example, synthesize their values so we understand what it means to be a relationalist and not an individualist. We need to create hubs where these decentralized networks can come together for solidarity and support. We need to create a shared Weaver identity. In 1960, few people called themselves feminists. By 1980, millions did. Just creating that social identity and that sense of mutual purpose is an act of great power.

I guess my ask is that you declare your own personal declaration of interdependence and decide to become a Weaver instead of a ripper. This is partly about communication. Every time you assault and stereotype a person, you’ve ripped the social fabric. Every time you see that person deeply and make him or her feel known, you’ve woven it.

We also need to have faith in each other. Right now, millions of people all over are responding to the crisis we all feel. We in the news media focus on Donald Trump and don’t cover them, but they are the most important social force in America right now. Renewal is building, relationship by relationship, community by community. It will spread and spread as the sparks fly upward.

The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here’s our email: letters@nytimes.com.

David Brooks has been a columnist with The Times since 2003. He is the author of “The Road to Character” and the forthcoming book, “The Second Mountain.”

Right to Repair

Stand up for your Right to Repair!

State Legislators have the power to protect you from unfair and deceptive policies that make it difficult, expensive, or impossible for you to repair the things you own. Right to Repair or Fair Repair Bills have been introduced in 18 states, but they  will only pass if you tell your lawmakers that you want Right to Repair.


Posted by Jerry Allen

To be a sustainable, resilient, self-reliant community we need to be able to reasonably fix stuff and not just throw it away and make another trip to the big box store. We also need to support local repair shops. It’s time to speak out for your right to repair

This year, the people of Oregon have a chance to guarantee their right to repair their stuff—like cell phones, laptops, and even tractors.

It’s yours. You own it. You shouldn’t have to beg the manufacturer for permission to fix it when it breaks. Tell your legislator that you want the right to repair.

There are two easy ways to get in touch: call and write. We’ll track down your legislator’s contact info for you.

Common Questions about Right to Repair

What does Right to Repair do?

Right to Repair is simple. It requires manufacturers to provide owners and independent repair businesses with fair access to service information and affordable replacement parts. So you can fix the stuff you own quickly—and get back on with your life.

That sounds great! Who would be against that?

Well, manufacturers like John Deere and Apple don’t like the idea. When your tractor breaks or your cell phone stops working, they want to be the only people who can fix it. And they get to set whatever prices they want for parts and service.

Is Right to Repair a new concept?

Nope! We already have right to repair for cars—that’s why you can take your Ford into a local mechanic. They have all the same software diagnostics and service manuals that the dealerships have. This is the result of decades of auto Right to Repair legislation—laws that have been a resounding success.

How can I get involved?

It’s time to fight for your right to repair and defend local repair jobs—the corner mom-and-pop repair shops that keep getting squeezed out. Write or call your legislator. Tell them you support the Fair Repair Act. Tell them that you believe repair should be fair, affordable, and accessible. Stand up for your right to repair in Oregon!
~~~~~~~~~~

Visit the Repair.org website, contact your representatives, and let your voice be heard. If you don’t want Apple to be the only place you can go to repair your iPhone or Mac computer, you need to reach out to your representatives and tell them that! This is really important!

Oregon Master Naturalist Training

The Oregon Master Naturalist Program provides an opportunity to learn about natural resources through the study of scientifically sound information: the natural history of plants, animals, habitats, and geology, the history and processes of landscape change, as well as the most relevant topics in present-day sustainable natural resource management. Participants volunteer for natural resources programs, agencies, organizations, and other groups in their communities.


OSU-MasterNaturalistProgram

The Oregon Master Naturalist Program is for people interested in Oregon’s natural history and natural resources management who want to dedicate their time as volunteers.

OSUMasterNaturalistProgram

How to Become an Oregon Master Naturalist

Your journey begins here!

You are about to set forth on a journey of learning, exploration, and service. To become a full-fledged Oregon Master Naturalist, there are several steps you must take. The Oregon Master Naturalist Program is ideal for those who wish to become certified Master Naturalists, but classes are open to anyone with interest, as space allows.

Steps to becoming an Oregon Master Naturalist

1. Complete the online core statewide coursework.

The course “Oregon Master Naturalist Online” provides a basic overview of Oregon’s natural history and the management of its natural resources (learn more).

2. Complete regional course requirements.

We currently offer courses in 5 Ecoregions, which are in-person coures taught within an ecologically distinct region of Oregon. You must take at least one Ecoregion to become an Oregon Master Naturalist (learn more).

3. Volunteer.

Once you have completed your coursework, you must volunteer for a natural resources oriented group or project for a minimum of 40 hours within the first full year after completing your coursework (learn more).

4. Maintain your certification.

To maintain your status as an Oregon Master Naturalist, you must continue to volunteer a minimum of 40 hours per year, and attend at least 8 hours of continuing education per year (learn more).

Ecoregion Field Courses

To become an Oregon State University Extension Master Naturalist, you must complete one Ecoregion field course. An Ecoregion course is a set of in-person classes taught within one of Oregon’s ecologically distinct regions. These field-based courses, taught by experts, introduce participants to a wide range of natural history and conservation topics relevant to a single Ecoregion. A typical course contains 6-8 all day classes. Full course participation is expected.

Klamath-Siskiyou Mountains (2018)

Ecoregion Field Courses begin May 18, 2018


 

For more information contact:

Jason O’Brien
Program Coordinator
Jason.obrien@oregonstate.edu
541-737-3856

Disaster Preparedness Planning Conference

DisasterPreparedness

Fruitdale Grange is hosting

Disaster Preparedness Planning Conference

May 23, 2018, 9-12 noon

Fruitdale Grange, 1440 Parkdale Drive,
Grants Pass, OR 97527

Overview
All over our state and country there are disasters that happen—fires, earthquakes, tornadoes, floods, tsunamis, blizzards and even occasional dislocations of essential food and water due to economic disasters. In order to encourage greater preparedness here in Josephine County, the Fruitdale Grange is hosting a Disaster Preparedness Planning Conference this Spring, before fire season.

We invite all governmental and other organizations to attend, such as: county emergency services, public health department, hospitals, schools, police, sheriff, fire departments, State Fire, water agencies, ODT & debris clearing agencies, city councils, Board of Commissioners, Human Services, CERT emergency responder organizations, service clubs, churches, synagogues, Red Cross, SPCA, Humane Society, homeless services, charities, food security experts, regional medical reserve corp., community radio stations and ham radio organizations, hardware stores, local food stores and farmers groups.

We will encourage all to frame the dialogue positively as exploring disaster risks, identifying greatest unmet needs and how we can work together to augment existing plans and develop greater regional preparedness.

We envision a matchmaking format wherein government agencies briefly state what they need help with and non-profits, stores, churches and service organizations state what they can help with. We look forward to working with all of you.


Please RSVP to help us plan for the space, with your name, organization and how many people will be attending to Jerry Allen at jerryallengitfiddler@gmail.com. Send any questions to the same email address. Thank you.

Blue Zones Project – Grants Pass

GP KO Blog.png

“Using secrets discovered in the original Blue Zones—rare longevity hotspots around the world—we help transform communities into thriving places to live, work, eat, and play.”  Blue Zones Project

Blue Zones Project–Grants Pass started the new year with a free and family-friendly public Kickoff celebration.

Held at Grants Pass High School on January 20th, the Kickoff attracted more than 600 community members who spent their afternoon exploring ways to be healthier and happier, and learning how to help improve the well-being of their community.

The upbeat Kickoff featured demonstrations by Club Northwest of tai chi, yoga, and aerobics, as well as a rousing performance by the Grants Pass High School Jazz Band.  Attendees enjoyed a wellness fair featuring local well-being organizations and resources.

A highlight of the event was a panel discussion hosted by Dr. Robin Miller, well-known author and KOBI-TV health expert. The panel featured Peggy Maguire, president of Blue Zones Project leadership funder, Cambia Health Foundation, and Sarah Foster, executive director of Oregon Healthiest State, a Blue Zones Project partner.

At the heart of the Kickoff was a keynote presentation by Nick Buettner, one of the original Blue Zones researchers and current Blue Zones community and corporate program director. After discussing the lifestyles and secrets of people living in the original Blue Zones around the globe, Buettner asked the crowd to make a personal commitment to their own and their community’s well-being. Nearly 300 people signed the pledge to make healthy lifestyle changes in their own lives.

“Community leaders and volunteers have worked hard over the last few months to develop our strategic plan and this Kickoff event is the official launch of Blue Zones Project in our community. We hope individuals and families will join us to learn and experience how we can all live longer, better lives,” said Diana Hoover, Blues Zones Project community program manager. “By focusing on helping change the settings where people spend most of their time we can make healthy choices easier, and we can make Grants Pass an even better place to live, work, learn, pray, and play.”

Blue Zones Kickoff events follow the expansion of a community well-being transformation strategy led by Oregon Healthiest State, an initiative focused on supporting communities in building a culture of health. Blue Zones Project was brought to Oregon by Cambia Health Foundation in support of Oregon Healthiest State. Community champions Asante Health System, AllCare Health, Primary Health of Josephine County, and Siskiyou Community Health Center are providing support for the Grants Pass initiative. Office space is being donated by Club Northwest.

“Our vision is for Oregon to be the healthiest state in the nation” Sarah Foster of Oregon Healthiest State told the audience. “To do this we have partnered with Blue Zones Project to create opportunities for lasting well-being transformation. It is so inspiring to see the Grant Pass initiative move from planning to implementation, especially knowing how much local thinking and leadership is guiding the work. The Kickoff celebration is an exciting milestone in the life of the initiative and I am greatly looking forward to it.”

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Blue Zones Project – Grants Pass Team  

Hoover Diane circle.jpgDiane Hoover
Before serving for six years at the Josephine County Health Department, Hoover spent 26 years in the United States Navy Medical Service Corps.  Her role, as Community Program Manager for the Blue Zones Project, will be to direct the execution of the initiative; to work directly with advocates, leaders, and volunteers; and to help drive policy priorities set by the community.

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George Prokop
Having previously launched programs and services worldwide while working for Hewlett-Packard for 30 years, Prokop brings a broad set of experiences to the team. He will be responsible for planning, executing, and finalizing projects while ensuring that programs stay aligned with Blue Zones Project strategies.

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Cort Cox
Cox joins the Grants Pass Blue Zones team after two years with the Blue Zones Project—Klamath Falls initiative. Cox is passionate about working closely with the community to create positive individual change.  His role will focus on driving communication efforts for the initiative while managing activities to inspire people to engage with Blue Zones Project practices and resources.

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Denise Kalic
With more than 20 years of experience in sales and business development, most recently with Harry & David and Lithia Motors, Kalic will be working directly with organizations across the region including grocery stores, schools, and worksites, helping them create settings that encourage improved well-being for the people they serve.

A COMMUNITY-WIDE APPROACH TO WELL-BEING

We don’t just rely on individual behavior change. We improve community health by making permanent and semi-permanent changes on multiple levels. We improve or optimize city streets (smoking policies, bike lanes, sidewalks), public spaces (parks, lakes, walking paths), schools (cafeterias, safe walking paths to school), restaurants, grocery stores, employers, faith-based organizations, and community involvement.

EFFECTIVE . IMPACTFUL . SUSTAINABLE .

 

Transformative Change: conversations with Fritjof Capra

An interesting conversation…

The Systems View of Life as a scientific basis of regeneration

by Daniel Christian Wahl

We need to educate ourselves and educate each other to learn the basic principles of ecology and systemic thinking and then we need to filter this through the local conditions and the local culture to create something that is lasting, sustainable and effective.— Fritjof Capra

Nature is sustainable because it is regenerative. That is the key lesson.
— Fritjof Capra

Manish Jain: “Our work is to recover wisdom and imagination”

 

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Rob Hopkins, founder of Transition Town interviews Manish Jain.

Manish Jain lives in Udaipur, Rajasthan, in North India.  He works with a movement called Shikshantar, ‘The Peoples’ Institute for Rethinking Education and Development’.  He has been working for the last 20 years, initiating many projects around unlearning, sustainable living, and Gift Culture. He is also co-founder of Swaraj University – India’s first university dedicated to localization. You can read more about his work here. He very kindly spent a fascinating hour chatting to me via Skype…

To read interview – watch the video and listen to the podcast go here