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Protecting Pollinators

Would a native bee like to live in your garden?

Kristina Lefever will talk about:   who the pollinators are, why they are  important, why they are disappearing, what we can do to help them, and how to turn our gardens into safe and nurturing havens for the pollinators.  Your local native bees, butterflies, flies, wasps, beetles and hummingbirds will thank you.

Rogue River Library

August 17, 2019   Noon – 1 PM.

 

Monarch Butterfly Summit

Monarch butterfly and caterpillar on Milkweed

MonarchButterflyConference

A migration of expertise and resources to conserve the
Western Monarch Butterfly

Friday-Sunday, January 10-12, 2020

Pacific Grove / Carmel By-The-Sea
COME JOIN US

A new networking opportunity for those involved in the conservation and restoration of the Western Monarch Butterfly.

By creating a wider community we will take flight with a united vision to improve what we each do in our own special

areas of interest and geographic locations.

Let’s work together to protect the Western Monarch!

SUMMIT HIGHLIGHTS
  • Update on overwintering sites
  • Importance of native milkweed
  • New genetic and tagging research
  • How can we all help
  • Field trips and more
  • Visit the Monarch overwintering sites and restoration areas
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
The Western Monarch Summit will come alive with two of the most prominent Monarch advocates in the country.

Dr. Chip Taylor
Founder & Director   Monarch Watch

Dr. Robert Pyle
Founder   Xerces Society

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$175  REGISTRATION DEADLINE 12/01/2019.  SEATING LIMITED.  RESERVE EARLY.

Includes three-day (Friday through Sunday) attendance and some meals as shown in the schedule.

CANCELLATION POLICY:  Attendees canceling before 12/01/2019 will receive a 50% refund.  Attendees canceling after 12/01/2019 will NOT be eligible for any refund.

NOTE:  Registration fees may be transferred to another individual no later than 12/01/2019.

 

 

 

A Chickadee’s Guide To Gardening By Douglas W. Tallamy

An excellent article on the value of planting native plants and the surprising things that can happen when you do!

11TALAMY-BLACKESUSAN-master1050
Black-eyed Susan and Goldfinches
The Rudbeckia species (like the black-eyed Susan) produce seeds that help sustain goldfinches during the winter.

From a New York Times March 11, 2015 article written by Douglas W. Tallamy

OXFORD, Pa. — I GREW up thinking little of plants. I was interested in snakes and turtles, then insects and, eventually, birds. Now I like plants. But I still like the life they create even more.

Plants are as close to biological miracles as a scientist could dare admit. After all, they allow us, and nearly every other species, to eat sunlight, by creating the nourishment that drives food webs on this planet. As if that weren’t enough, plants also produce oxygen, build topsoil and hold it in place, prevent floods, sequester carbon dioxide, buffer extreme weather and clean our water. Considering all this, you might think we gardeners would value plants for what they do. Instead, we value them for what they look like.

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Mayapple and Box Turtles
Mayapples produce fleshy fruit whose seeds germinate with help from box turtles.

When we design our home landscapes, too many of us choose beautiful plants from all over the world, without considering their ability to support life within our local ecosystems.

Last summer I did a simple experiment at home to measure just how different the plants we use for landscaping can be in supporting local animals. I compared a young white oak in my yard with one of the Bradford pears in my neighbor’s yard. Both trees are the same size, but Bradford pears are ornamentals from Asia, while white oaks are native to eastern North America. I walked around each tree and counted the caterpillars on their leaves at head height. I found 410 caterpillars on the white oak (comprising 19 different species), and only one caterpillar (an inchworm) on the Bradford pear.

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Milkweed and Monarch Butterflies
Monarch butterflies are disappearing because we have destroyed so many of the milkweed plants they depend on.

Was this a fluke? Hardly. The next day I repeated my survey on a different white oak and Bradford pear. This time I found 233 caterpillars on the white oak (comprising 15 species) and, again, only one on the Bradford pear.

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Oak, Red-Bellied Woodpeckers and Blue Jays
Oaks produce copious amounts of acorns that support many birds through the winter months. This is particularly true for red-bellied woodpeckers and blue jays.

Why such huge differences? It’s simple: Plants don’t want to be eaten, so they have loaded their tissues with nasty chemicals that would kill most insects if eaten. Insects do eat plants, though, and they achieve this by adapting to the chemical defenses of just one or two plant lineages. So some have evolved to eat oak trees without dying, while others have specialized in native cherries or ashes and so on.

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Pawpaw and Zebra Swallowtails
The larvae of these black-and-white-striped butterflies develop on pawpaw plants.

But local insects have only just met Bradford pears, in an evolutionary sense, and have not had the time — millennia — required to adapt to their chemical defenses. And so Bradford pears stand virtually untouched in my neighbor’s yard.

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Spicebush and Spicebush Swallowtails
The larvae of these butterflies hide from predators by mimicking tree snakes and curling up within the spicebush’s leaves.

In the past, we thought this was a good thing. After all, Asian ornamentals were planted to look pretty, and we certainly didn’t want insects eating them. We were happy with our perfect pears, burning bushes, Japanese barberries, porcelain berries, golden rain trees, crape myrtles, privets, bush honeysuckles and all the other foreign ornamentals.

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Violet and Regal Fritillaries
The larvae of these butterflies, whose numbers are declining, survive exclusively on violets in the United States.

But there are serious ecological consequences to such choices, and another exercise you can do at home makes them clear. This spring, if you live in North America, put up a chickadee nest box in your yard. If you are lucky, a pair of chickadees will move in and raise a family. While they are feeding their young, watch what the chickadees bring to the nest: mostly caterpillars. Both parents take turns feeding the chicks, enabling them to bring a caterpillar to the nest once every three minutes. And they do this from 6 a.m. until 8 p.m. for each of the 16 to 18 days it takes the chicks to fledge. That’s a total of 350 to 570 caterpillars every day, depending on how many chicks they have. So, an incredible 6,000 to 9,000 caterpillars are required to make one clutch of chickadees.

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Bayberry and Yellow-Rumped Warblers
Bayberry plants make waxy fruits that sustain these birds all winter.

And chickadees are tiny birds: just a third of an ounce. What if you wanted to support red-bellied woodpeckers in your yard, a bird that is about eight times heavier than a chickadee? How many caterpillars would that take?

chickadee
Chickadee

What we plant in our landscapes determines what can live in our landscapes. Controlling what grows in our yards is like playing God. By favoring productive species, we can create life, and by using nonnative plants, we can prevent it.

An American yard dominated by Asian ornamentals does not produce nearly the quantity and diversity of insects needed for birds to reproduce. Some might argue that we should just let those birds breed “in nature.” That worked in the past, but now there simply is not enough “nature” left. And it shows. Many bird species in North America have declined drastically in the past 40 years.

Fortunately, more and more gardeners are realizing that their yards offer one of the most empowering conservation options we have, and are sharing their properties with the nature around them.

By the way, you might assume that my oak was riddled with unsightly caterpillar holes, but not so. Since birds eat most of the caterpillars before they get very large, from 10 feet away the oak looked as perfect as a Bradford pear.

————————————————-

Douglas W. Tallamy, a professor of entomology and wildlife ecology at the University of Delaware, is the author of “Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife With Native Plants.”
Website: Bringing Nature Home

A version of this op-ed appears in print on March 11, 2015, on page A25 of the New York edition with the headline: The Chickadee’s Guide to Gardening.

PHOTO CREDITS:

All animal photos by Douglas W. Tallamy except the woodpecker. Rob Cardillo for The New York Times (violets), Susan Farley for The New York Times (black-eyed Susans), Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times (mayapple), William Widmer for The New York Times (oak), Randy Harris for The New York Times (pawpaw), Mike Mergen (spicebush), Scott Camazine/Getty Images (bayberry), Jim Lo Scalzo/European Pressphoto Agency (milkweed) and John McNamara (woodpecker).

“Building Transformational Resilience for Climate Change Traumas and Toxic Stresses”

ACEsConnection

An event hosted by ACE’s Connection

You are invited to watch the webinar together at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall, 129 NW E Street, Grants Pass, OR – to share the learning.

September 10, 2019 11:00 am

You can sign up now here. Copy/paste this into your browser: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_VcuqXdZJTp-HeD5PLJQrIQ

You will learn:

• how climate change creates personal, family, and community traumas and toxic stresses;
• how those traumatic stressors trigger feedbacks that expand and aggravate ACEs and many other person, social, community, and societal maladies;
• why current approaches are woefully inadequate to address what is already occurring and rapidly steaming toward us and why prevention is the only realistic solution;
• the framework for prevention we call Transformational Resilience that includes resilience education and skills-development focused on both Presencing and Purposing skills.


Speakers:
Bob Doppelt, Executive Director, The Resource Innovation Group, and Founder and Coordinator of the International Transformational Resilience Coalition (ITRC).

The International Transformational Resilience Coalition (ITRC) is a network of over 400 mental health, social service, social justice, climate, emergency response, faith, and other professionals working to prevent harmful personal, family, community, and societal maladies resulting from climate change generated traumas and toxic stresses by ensuring that every adult and child in the U.S. and worldwide learns preventative Presencing (self-regulation) and Purposing (adversity-based growth) information and skills.

Please submit any questions to: alison.cebulla.aces@gmail.com

What Kind of World Do You Want to Live in?

Charles Eisenstein is interviewed by Pachamama Alliance about “What kind of world do you want to live in?” and gives us a taste of what we can expect in his new book Climate: A New Story in this series of short videos:

The Core Themes of Climate: A New Story

What Kind of World Do You Want to Live in?

Our Salvation Will Come from the Margins

Signs that Humanity is Returning to Loving a Living Earth

Ask for the book at our local bookstores or read it online on Charles website: https://charleseisenstein.org/books/climate-a-new-story

Join the Sustainable Rogue Valley group Sunday Aug. 11th from 12:30 – 2:00 at the UU Fellowship Hall at 129 NW E Street, Grants Pass, OR and discover what you can do to help make your local community and our global community more resilient, regenerative and climate-friendly.

ACES Trainings & Workshop and Southern Oregon Success Updates

OPEN ACES TRAININGS AND OPEN WORKSHOP IN SELF-REGULATION & RESILIENCE COMING UP IN MEDFORD

The Southern Oregon ACEs Training Team is offering ACEs sessions for all comers on Tuesday, July 23 and Wednesday, August 14, from 1 pm to 3 pm at the SOESD, 101 North Grape Street in Medford, as well as a workshop in Self-Regulation & Resilience on Tuesday, July 30, from 1 pm to 2:30 pm at the same location. Thanks to funding by our partner organizations, there is no cost for these sessions. Members of all agencies and the general public are welcome.

The ACEs training focuses on the science of N.E.A.R. (Neurobiology, Epigenetics, Adverse Childhood Experiences and Resilience), providing vital information on the impact of trauma on development as well as the core protective systems of resilience

The Self-Regulation & Resilience workshop offers a review of the N.E.A.R. curriculum (Neurobiology, Epigenetics, ACEs and Resilience) covered in the team’s ongoing ACEs trainings then moves to a focus on specific tools for self-regulation and resilience.

For the ACEs training session on July 23, please register here.

For the ACEs training session on August 14, please register here.

For the workshop in Self-Regulation & Resilience, please register here.

To schedule a training session or workshop for any group, or for more information, contact peter_buckley@southernoregonsuccess.org.

COMMUNITY HEALTH IMPROVEMENT PLAN ANNOUNCED

An unprecedented collaboration led by the Jefferson Regional Health Alliance has resulted in the publication of the 2019-2022 Community Health Improvement Plan for Jackson and Josephine Counties, titled “All In For Health.”

For the first time, our region’s hospitals (Asante and Providence), Coordinated Care Organizations (AllCare, PrimaryHealth and Jackson Care Connect) and federally qualified health clinics (La Clinica, Siskiyou Community Health Center and Rogue Community Health) joined together with the Addictions Recovery Center, OnTrack, ColumbiaCare Services, Kairos, Options for Southern Oregon, OSU Extension Service, the VA Southern Oregon Rehabilitation Center & Clinics, Jackson County Public Health & Mental Health, Josephine County Public Health and the Rogue Valley Council of Governments to go through their mandated Community Health Assessment (CHA), which has now resulted in a region-wide Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP).

The process has included hundreds of people in health care, human services and the community at large. From all the data collected, all the focus group discussions and surveys completed, the plan that has evolved sets three prioritized areas of need: Behavior Health & Well-Being (mental health and substance use), Housing for All (safe, affordable, appropriate housing) and Families Matter (parenting support and life skills).

To read the proposed strategies and approaches for progress in these three areas, you can find the Community Health Improvement Plan, “All In For Health,” at the Jefferson Regional Health Alliance website.

HEARTS WITH A MISSION LEADS “SAFE FAMILIES FOR CHILDREN” PROGRAM

Hearts with a Mission, a remarkable local organization serving children and youth, is working with the Department of Human Services to administer and coordinate an innovative program for families in crisis, Safe Families For Children.

Kevin Lamson, Executive Director for Hearts With A Mission, explained that his organization has been implementing the Safe Families For Children program in Jackson County since 2014.  “We brought the program with us to Josephine County in 2016 and opened a Hub for Safe Families in Lincoln County in January of 2019,” Lamson said.

As described by DHS, the Safe Families program provides opportunities for families to access supportive resources including host families for caregivers who may be experiencing crisis and are in need of a safe place for their children to stay temporarily.

Host families create an extended family-like support through a community of devoted volunteers who are motivated by compassion to keep kids safe and families intact. The primary purpose of a host family is to support those who are currently, potentially or at risk of becoming involved with Child Welfare.

Hearts With A Mission is working with faith-based organizations to recruit host families and support groups, and to ensure each family in the program has a family coach as well.

“This is something Oregon is leading the country in–attempting to prevent foster care through SFFC, which recently was confirmed an evidenced-based program,” Lamson noted.

For additional information about Safe Families, check out the videos below. To get more information about how Hearts With A Mission is working with the program locally, or to volunteer to help, contact Heather Siewell at heather.s@heartswithamission.org.

 

CASA NEEDS VOLUNTEERS TO HELP CHILDREN

CASA of Jackson County, founded in 1990, is a non-profit organization responsible for recruiting, training and supporting the work of CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) volunteers.  CASAs advocate for abused and neglected children by making recommendations to the court regarding the immediate and future needs of the children in the care of Child Welfare.

Volunteer CASAs are the voice of the child in court and are generally the only consistent person to follow each child’s case to completion. To be a CASA, you must be at least 21 years of age, have a heart for children, be able to attend meetings and court hearings, maintain objectivity, and always speak to the child’s best interest.

We need more CASAs to advocate for the 200 children currently waiting for a CASA. To learn more, attend an hour-long orientation on any Thursday at 12:00pm at the CASA office, 409 Front St., Medford. No appointment necessary, just drop in. For additional information, call 541-734-2272.

 

SHERIFF’S ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOCUSES ON ADDICTION RECOVERY AND MENTAL HEALTH

A community advisory committee on the proposal to build a new jail facility in Jackson County has been convened by Sheriff Nathan Sickler. The committee, made up of local government officials, public safety personnel, mental health advocates, addiction recovery specialists and other community members, met for the first time on July 8 to review data on jail bookings, learn more about current support services, and discuss the impacts of addiction on individuals, families and the community.

Additional meetings are being planned for the next few months to discuss mental health issues, existing and potential new programs to divert people away from jail, and ideas for the design for a facility that can prioritize public safety while also offering paths to health, recovery and good citizenship.

(Notes by Southern Oregon Success Program Manager Peter Buckley)

To schedule a training session or workshop for any group, or for more information, contact peter_buckley@southernoregonsuccess.org.

JOIN US ON FACEBOOK

The Facebook page for Southern Oregon Success features almost daily postings of events taking place in our region and information shared from all over as part of our learning community efforts on what works and what doesn’t in helping kids and families thrive.

If you do Facebook, check us out and Like us at Southern Oregon Success.

Sustainable Rogue Valley presents

Support Group for Earth Activists

Saturday, June 22, 2019   1 – 3 pm

Unitarian Universalist Hall,
129 NW ‘E’ Street, Grants Pass, 97526
  • Potluck snacks are encouraged
  • Please bring your utensils

Activism is hard work. It can lead to burnout, feelings of isolation, frustration and discouragement, as well as many other feelings. Some of us were inspired by an Awakening the Dreamer seminar recently and decided to hold this support group and invite other activists as well.

This gathering will be a safe space for people involved in earth activism of all kinds to gather and give and receive support, talk about issues they face as activists, ask for help and give help to others. It won’t be a forum for debate, but rather a place where we can gain strength from being together.

info@sevengenerations.org

“We are stronger together”

Hope in a Changing Climate – by John D. Liu

Hope in a Changing Climate optimistically reframes the debate on global warming. Illustrating that large, decimated eco-systems can be restored, the BBC World documentary reveals success stories from Ethiopia, Rwanda and China which prove that bringing large areas back from environmental ruin is possible, and key to stabilising the earth’s climate, eradicating poverty and making sustainable agriculture a reality.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLdNhZ6kAzo

The 3.5% Rule: How a Small Minority Can Change the World

Nonviolent protests are twice as likely to succeed as armed conflicts – and those engaging a threshold of 3.5% of the population have never failed to bring about change.

In 1986, millions of Filipinos took to the streets of Manila in peaceful protest and prayer in the People Power movement. The Marcos regime folded on the fourth day.

In 2003, the people of Georgia ousted Eduard Shevardnadze through the bloodless Rose Revolution, in which protestors stormed the parliament building holding the flowers in their hands.

Earlier this year, the presidents of Sudan and Algeria both announced they would step aside after decades in office, thanks to peaceful campaigns of resistance.

In each case, civil resistance by ordinary members of the public trumped the political elite to achieve radical change.

To read the article from the BBC:

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20190513-it-only-takes-35-of-people-to-change-the-world?utm_source=pocket-newtab

 

Public Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES) Presentation


N GRANTS PASS:

Public Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES) Presentation

Dinner and Childcare provided (ages 3 to 10)

     The Grants Pass School District is pleased to invite the Grants Pass community to public presentations on the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study, or ACES for short. This 90 minute presentation will cover what the study was, what we now know about the amazing ways we as humans adapt to our world, why ACES play a significant role in the quality of our health as adults, and most importantly, what we can do together to reduce adversity in our community and improve our overall health and quality of life.

     We will serve a pizza dinner at 5:30 pm to everyone who can come. We will also be providing childcare for ages 3 to 10. We encourage you to bring your children to dinner. After dinner, our Grants Pass high school leadership students will be providing childcare for you. While they play, you can come to the presentation to learn about ACES, how it impacts most of us, and how we can become resilient through our adversity. The presentation will begin at 6 pm.

     Interested? Click here and let us know you are coming. You will get a confirmation email when you register for the event. No email? No problem. Give us a call at (541) 474-5715 (press 1 at the voice message).

Date and Location:

May 6 at Riverside Elementary (1200 SE Harvey Drive, Grants Pass, OR 97526)

These presentations are open to the public.

Todd Bloomquist
tbloomquist@grantspass.k12.or.us
541-474-5715

Community Forum on Wildfire

Come join us for Community Forum Night at the Fruitdale Grange

All Hands On Deck (focus on Fire)

fire-pic

Thursday evening, March 28, 2019, 6:30-8:30pm,

Fruitdale Grange, 1440 Parkdale Drive, Grants Pass, 97527

Overview
This forum will specifically focus on fires and poor air quality like we experienced last summer. As we look toward solutions and how to mitigate this risk, we will hear from fire experts and have an opportunity to ask questions such as how can we reduce the risk of catastrophic fires and accompanying smoke? And what plans are being made by government and agencies to prepare for the coming summer?  

We invite all governmental, service groups, emergency services and community organizations to attend, as well as concerned citizens. All are welcome.

Any questions please contact Jerry Allen at jerry@thistledownorchards.com.

We hope to see you there!

A Nation of Weavers

An excellent article on the importance of building “radical mutuality”, by David Brooks:

The social renaissance is happening from the ground up.

David Brooks

By David Brooks

Opinion Columnist

Photo by Gabriela Bhaskar for The New York TimesGabriela Bhaskar for The New York Times

I start with the pain. A couple times a week I give a speech somewhere in the country about social isolation and social fragmentation. Very often a parent comes up to me afterward and says, “My daughter took her life when she was 14.” Or, “My son died of an overdose when he was 20.”

Their eyes flood with tears. I don’t know what to say. I squeeze a shoulder just to try to be present with them, but the crying does not stop. As it turns to weeping they rush out of the auditorium and I am left with my own futility. What can I say to these parents? What can I say to the parents still around who don’t yet know they may soon become those parents?

This kind of pain is an epidemic in our society. When you cover the sociology beat as I do, you see other kinds of pain. The African-American woman in Greenville who is indignant because young black kids in her neighborhood face injustice just as gross as she did in 1953. The college student in the Midwest who is convinced that she is the only one haunted by compulsive thoughts about her own worthlessness. The Trump-supporting small-business man in Louisiana who silently clenches his fists in rage as guests at a dinner party disparage his whole way of life.

These different kinds of pain share a common thread: our lack of healthy connection to each other, our inability to see the full dignity of each other, and the resulting culture of fear, distrust, tribalism, shaming and strife.

On Dec. 7, 1941, countless Americans saw that their nation was in peril and walked into recruiting stations. We don’t have anything as dramatic as Pearl Harbor, but when 47,000 Americans kill themselves every year and 72,000 more die from drug addiction, isn’t that a silent Pearl Harbor? When the basic norms of decency, civility and truthfulness are under threat, isn’t that a silent Pearl Harbor? Aren’t we all called at moments like these to do something extra?

My something extra was starting something nine months ago at the Aspen Institute called Weave: The Social Fabric Project. The first core idea was that social isolation is the problem underlying a lot of our other problems. The second idea was that this problem is being solved by people around the country, at the local level, who are building community and weaving the social fabric. How can we learn from their example and nationalize their effect?

We traveled around the country and found them everywhere. We’d plop into big cities like Houston and small towns like Wilkesboro, N.C., and we’d find 25 to 100 community “Weavers” almost immediately. This is a movement that doesn’t know it’s a movement.

Some of them work at organizations: a vet who helps other mentally ill vets in New Orleans; a guy who runs a boxing gym in Appalachian Ohio where he nominally teaches young men boxing, but really teaches them life; a woman who was in the process of leaving the Englewood neighborhood in Chicago when she saw two little girls playing with broken bottles in the empty lot across the street. She turned to her husband and said: We’re not moving away from that. We’re not going to be just another family that abandoned this place.

Many others do their weaving in the course of everyday life — because that’s what neighbors do. One lady in Florida said she doesn’t have time to volunteer, but that’s because she spends 40 hours a week looking out for local kids and visiting sick folks in the hospital. We go into neighborhoods and ask, “Who is trusted here?” In one neighborhood it was the guy who collects the fees at the parking garage.

We’re living with the excesses of 60 years of hyperindividualism. There’s a lot of emphasis in our culture on personal freedom, self-interest, self-expression, the idea that life is an individual journey toward personal fulfillment. You do you. But Weavers share an ethos that puts relationship over self. We are born into relationships, and the measure of our life is in the quality of our relationships. We precedes me.

Whether they live in red or blue America, they often use the same terms and embody the same values — deep hospitality, showing up for people and keep showing up. They are somewheres, not anywheres — firmly planted in their local community. I met one guy in Ohio who began his work by standing in the town square with a sign: “Defend Youngstown.”

The phrase we heard most was “the whole person.” Whether you are a teacher, a nurse or a neighbor, you have to see and touch the whole person — the trauma, the insecurities and the dreams as much as the body and the brain.

But the trait that leaps out above all others is “radical mutuality”: We are all completely equal, regardless of where society ranks us. “I am broken; I need others to survive,” an afterschool program leader in Houston told us. “We don’t do things for people. We don’t do things to people. We do things with people,” said a woman who builds community for teenagers in New Orleans.

Being around these people has been one of the most uplifting experiences of my life. Obviously, it’s made me want to be more neighborly, to be more active and intentional in how I extend care.

But it has also changed my moral lens. I’ve become so impatient with the politicians I cover! They are so self-absorbed! Social scientists tell us that selfishness is natural, people are motivated by money, power and status. But Weavers are not motivated by any of these things. They want to live in right relation with others and to serve the community good.

Their example has shown me that we don’t just have a sociological problem; we have a moral problem. We all create a shared moral ecology through the daily decisions of our lives. When we stereotype, abuse, impugn motives and lie about each other, we’ve ripped the social fabric and encouraged more ugliness. When we love across boundaries, listen patiently, see deeply and make someone feel known, we’ve woven it and reinforced generosity. As Charles Péguy said, “The revolution is moral or not at all.”
Get a more personal, less conventional take on political developments, newsmakers, cultural milestones and more with Frank Bruni’s exclusive commentary every week.

So the big question is: How do we take the success the Weavers are having on the local level and make it national? The Weavers are building relationships one by one, which takes time. Relationships do not scale.

But norms scale. If you can change the culture, you can change behavior on a large scale. If you can change the lens through which people see the world, as these Weavers have changed mine, then you can change the way people want to be in the world and act in the world. So that’s our job. To shift the culture so that it emphasizes individualism less and relationalism more.

Culture changes when a small group of people, often on the margins of society, find a better way to live, and other people begin to copy them. These Weavers have found a better way to live. We at Weave — and all of us — need to illuminate their example, synthesize their values so we understand what it means to be a relationalist and not an individualist. We need to create hubs where these decentralized networks can come together for solidarity and support. We need to create a shared Weaver identity. In 1960, few people called themselves feminists. By 1980, millions did. Just creating that social identity and that sense of mutual purpose is an act of great power.

I guess my ask is that you declare your own personal declaration of interdependence and decide to become a Weaver instead of a ripper. This is partly about communication. Every time you assault and stereotype a person, you’ve ripped the social fabric. Every time you see that person deeply and make him or her feel known, you’ve woven it.

We also need to have faith in each other. Right now, millions of people all over are responding to the crisis we all feel. We in the news media focus on Donald Trump and don’t cover them, but they are the most important social force in America right now. Renewal is building, relationship by relationship, community by community. It will spread and spread as the sparks fly upward.

The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here’s our email: letters@nytimes.com.

David Brooks has been a columnist with The Times since 2003. He is the author of “The Road to Character” and the forthcoming book, “The Second Mountain.”

Learn about 5G technology

5G Technology

Since you are no doubt already seeing information about the wonders of the new 5G technology, and will be more and more in the upcoming weeks, it seems only right that you should also be offered the other side of the picture as well, so that you might make a more informed decision as to whether you want to support this new technology.

Neither Smart meters/phones/cars/homes nor 5G have been proven safe so far. There have been, however, many scientific studies that have shown that the effects of these technologies can bring harm to all forms of life. The massive die-off of the insect population across the globe may well be caused by the already ubiquitous electromagnetic disturbances at the levels we now have. 5G technology will be 100 to 1000 times stronger and much more pervasive.

If you think that all those who oppose the world wide roll out of this new technology are simply Luddites or conspiracy theorists, take a few minutes to read some of the material on the websites listed below. These are created by groups of concerned scientists and medical doctors who have seen evidence of harm in their research and in their medical practices and decided to take a stand.

If you believe that our governments and institutions would not allow something harmful, please recall the tobacco industry, the asbestos industry, and the many chemicals that – after years of use by the general public – have been found to be harmful and taken off the market.  Round-Up (glyphosate) is in the midst of this process right now, after some 40 yrs.

And so we offer you the following information to get you started.  Below are links to several websites where you will find information to help you make a more informed decision.

 

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From the 5G Appeal website:

“Over 230 scientists from more than 40 countries have expressed their “serious concerns” regarding the ubiquitous and increasing exposure to EMF generated by electric and wireless devices already before the additional 5G roll-out. They refer to the fact that ”numerous recent scientific publications have shown that EMF affects living organisms at levels well below most international and national guidelines”. Effects include increased cancer risk, cellular stress, increase in harmful free radicals, genetic damages, structural and functional changes of the reproductive system, learning and memory deficits, neurological disorders, and negative impacts on general well-being in humans. Damage goes well beyond the human race, as there is growing evidence of harmful effects to both plants and animals.

 

From the Physicians for Safe Technology website:

https://mdsafetech.org/5g-telecommunications-science/

“The researchers state, “The results also show that the peak-to-average ratio of 1,000 tolerated by the International Council on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines may lead to permanent tissue damage after even short exposures, highlighting the importance of revisiting existing exposure guidelines.”

 


International Society of Doctors for the Environment Support 5G Moratorium

https://www.saferemr.com/2017/09/5G-moratorium12.html

In April, 2018, the International Society of Doctors for the Environment (ISDE) and its member organizations in 27 countries, adopted a declaration calling for a moratorium on the deployment of 5G (fifth generation cellular technology) in the European Union.

The declaration is entitled,5G networks in European Countries: appeal for a standstill in the respect of the precautionary principle.”

“We believe it should be unethical to ignore the available evidence waiting a possible “a posteriori” demonstration of health damages in the presence of a present and potentially manageable risk for public health.

Thus, in the respect of the precautionary principle and of the WHO principle “health in all policies”, we believe suitable the request of a standstill for the “5G experimentations” throughout Europe until an adequate and active involvement of public institutions operating in the field of environmental health (health ministry, environmental ministry, national environmental and health agencies) will be effectively planned.”

 

INTERNATIONAL APPEAL
Stop 5G on Earth and in Space

https://www.5gspaceappeal.org/the-appeal

“If the telecommunications industry’s plans for 5G come to fruition, no person, no animal, no bird, no insect and no plant on Earth will be able to avoid exposure, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, to levels of RF radiation that are tens to hundreds of times greater than what exists today, without any possibility of escape anywhere on the planet. These 5G plans threaten to provoke serious, irreversible effects on humans and permanent damage to all of the Earth’s ecosystems.

Immediate measures must be taken to protect humanity and the environment, in accordance with ethical imperatives and international agreements.”

 

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Scientists and doctors warn of potential serious health effects of 5G

The appeal

“We the undersigned scientists and doctors recommend a moratorium on the roll-out of the fifth generation, 5G, for telecommunication until potential hazards for human health and the environment have been fully investigated by scientists independent from industry.  5G will substantially increase exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on top of the 2G, 3G, 4G, Wi-Fi, etc. for telecommunications already in place. RF-EMF has been proven to be harmful for humans and the environment.”

https://www.5gappeal.eu/what-is-5g-an-introduction/

 

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5G – From Blankets To Bullets

by Arthur Firstenberg

The single most important fact about 5G that nobody is talking about is called “phased array.” It will totally change the way cell towers and cell phones are constructed and will transform the blanket of radiation which has enveloped our world for two decades into a million powerful beams whizzing by us at all times. ……

READ ARTICLE…..

http://www.cellphonetaskforce.org/5g-from-blankets-to-bullets/

 

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