The Value and Importance of Water Retention on our Land

One of the most valuable things to do for ourselves, future generations and all life on earth, in this climate crisis, is to find ways to capture rainwater on the land to soak into the groundwater and aquifers as it is meant to and regenerate the life of our planet.   “Water Retention Landscapes are … Continue reading The Value and Importance of Water Retention on our Land

Update on RCC Bioswale/RainGarden Project

  The new gravel path is nearly finished and runs from one end of the garden to the other, the boulders have been placed, and four bird houses hung: three have larger holes for Bluebirds or Swallows (most likely violet green), and one is for smaller birds (Chickadees or Nuthatches) (see below).  SRV member Mike … Continue reading Update on RCC Bioswale/RainGarden Project

Learn about Rain Gardens and Bioswales at RCC

The following is a Press Release put out by Rogue Community College about the project Sustainable Rogue Valley is doing in collaboration with them on the Grants Pass Redwood Campus.   Grants Pass-Rogue Community College (RCC) and Sustainable Rogue Valley are working together to complete the demonstration Rain Garden and Bioswale on the RCC Redwood … Continue reading Learn about Rain Gardens and Bioswales at RCC

Volunteers needed to complete the RCC Raingarden Project

Volunteers Needed for Planting February 16th - Meet at the Josephine Building parking lot between 10 am and 2 pm Volunteers Needed for Trail Construction March 16th - Meet at the Josephine Building parking lot between 10 am and 2 pm Volunteer opportunities are scheduled for anyone to get involved. Students are welcome and encouraged to … Continue reading Volunteers needed to complete the RCC Raingarden Project

December 2017 Update on RCC Raingarden/Bioswale Project

NEARLY FINISHED! Here are pictures taken this summer and fall of the progress on the Project. Chas Rogers has done an amazing job – not only writing the grants, but coordinating the work and DOING a huge amount himself!  We just had a big planting day before Thanksgiving and LOTS of folks showed up – … Continue reading December 2017 Update on RCC Raingarden/Bioswale Project

Water Conservation Done Creatively

The following article was just posted by Utne - an online and paper magazine.  Sustainable Rogue Valley is presently in the midst of creating a large demonstration Rain Garden and Bioswale at Rogue Community College Campus in Grants Pass, OR., and created and care for a small version at the Josephine County Fairgrounds in 2016. … Continue reading Water Conservation Done Creatively

RCC Rain Gardens and Bioswales

Sustainable Rogue Valley, in conjunction with other funders, is planning to construct Raingardens and Bioswales on the Rogue Community College property in Grants Pass, Oregon. Raingardens are made to collect rainwater in ponds and maintain a healthy plant community while encouraging water to slow down and filter into the ground. They produce a pleasing environment … Continue reading RCC Rain Gardens and Bioswales

Power to the People

Why the rise of green energy makes utility companies nervous. From the June 2015 New Yorker Magazine article by Bill McKibben Mark and Sara Borkowski live with their two young daughters in a century-old, fifteen-hundred-square-foot house in Rutland, Vermont. Mark drives a school bus, and Sara works as a special-ed teacher; the cost of heating … Continue reading Power to the People

Beautiful, hard-working Rain Gardens

The following is a blog post from The Holistic Garden blog by Barb Allen: Last fall we built a rain garden that collects rainwater that runs from the roof and driveway. Normally this water would have run down the slope behind the house into a creek and off the property. Now it fills up the rain garden and soaks into the ground in a few hours, replenishing the groundwater that feeds our well. In the midst of a serious drought that’s pretty comforting. It worked so well, we’re creating mini-rain gardens and swales all over the property now to slow down the flow and allow it to soak into the soil. I have a half acre of garden that I water through the dry summer months, so it would be hard to store enough water in a cistern or in plastic tanks to take care of 4 – 5 months of watering. And the house is down slope from the garden so I couldn’t figure out a way to collect it in tanks and get it uphill to the garden. I chewed on that problem for a couple years. Then, in the process of looking for answers online, I ran across the concept of “rain gardens”, and the fact that they hold water, allowing it to soak into the soil and replenish the groundwater. Around the same time I came across a story by Geoffrey Lawton of Permaculture fame, about a property where they put in a series of swales running down a slope. After a couple years of collecting rainwater in the swales, a spring popped out on the hillside! Suddenly the idea of saving rain water in the GROUND seemed like the simplest and most natural solution!