FILM Screening: ArtiFISHal plus Native Storytelling, and Panel Discussion

August 22 @ Medford Library Large Community Room 

Doors Open at 5:30 pm, Programming starts at 6 pm. 

   

The Rogue Valley Food System Network invites you to join us for an evening about the story of the salmon, from the original people to the current day issues.  

We will begin the evening with an honoring of the Salmon people, and the role the Salmon has played as a part of this valley since the beginning of time. 
 
Each year the Takelmas honor the salmon with a sacred ceremony at Ti’lomikh along the Rogue River. Storyteller Thomas Doty will share stories of the Salmon People, and the relationship the Old Ones formed with them thousands of years ago. Thomas Doty will share with us the story of the Salmon.

We will then come together to watch the film, Artifishal. 

Produced by Patagonia, Artifishal is a film about wild rivers and wild fish that explores the high cost — ecological,
financial and cultural — of our mistaken belief that engineered solutions can make up for habitat destruction. The film traces the impact of fish hatcheries, and the extraordinary amount of public money wasted on an industry that hinders wild fish recovery pollutes our rivers and contributes to the problem it claims to solve. Artifishal also dives beneath the surface of the open-water fish farm controversy, as citizens work to stop the damage done to public waters and our remaining wild salmon.

From a food systems perspective, we are interested in hosting an open dialogue that leaves the consumer with the knowledge to make their own choices about what they want to support with their daily food choices. 

Film Trailer

Panel Discussion to Follow with local Salmon Stakeholders 

Confirmed Panelists:
 Jacob Battisti, Siskiyou Salmon Owner, and Fisherman.  
 Jack Crawford, Native Fish Society 
   

We look forward to seeing you there! 
   RVFoodSystem

Moving to Local Sustainable Food Production

raptorcreekfarmprogram

Our next Sustainable Rogue Valley meeting on Sunday Dec. 4 features guest speaker Gif Gates, Manager of Raptor Creek Farm.
Gif will share about the farm and the Josephine County Food Bank’s vision and strategy for long term food security. Come hear about the history of Raptor Creek Farm, their clients and the statistics of food insecurity in Jo Co, the youth and senior programs at the farm, current development and future projects, community involvement at the food bank farm, how folks can get involved, and more!
Due to the holidays, our next Sustainable Rogue Valley meeting will be on Sunday December 4 (not our usual 4th Sunday schedule)
We now meet at the new UU church, 129 NW E street, GP, 12:30 to 2pm. 
It’s easy to find, across the street from Mamosa’s!

Communities Grow Stronger with Fruit Tree Projects

Photo By Heike Brauer
Photo By Heike Brauer

Fruit Tree Projects are helping feed communities all over the world. Here’s how the Santa Cruz fruit tree project got started.

By Maria Grusauskas, from Shareable.

Article courtesy of Utne Reader

Over the past few years, “Fruit Tree Projects” have been popping up all over the world, from Vancouver and Portland, to New Orleans, to Fiji and Australia and beyond. They start small, with just one or two proactive individuals who are pained by the sight of perfectly good fruit in the late stages of decomposition.

Some Fruit Tree Projects redistribute their fruit harvests to undernourished communities, while others gobble them up themselves, and many celebrate the harvest by getting together and processing large quantities of fruit into any number of delicacies.

Even with the variations in types of Fruit Projects out there, one basic truth remains the same: the only thing standing between a hungry belly and the world’s excess fruit supply is a knock on a neighbor’s door.

For Steve Schnaar, (whose childhood memories include picking apples with his family), knocking on doors to inquire about overladen fruit trees was a hobby that soon blossomed into the Santa Cruz Fruit Tree Project, now in its third year in Santa Cruz, California.

“I have a long history of knocking on people’s doors and saying ‘it looks like you have more apples than you can handle,’ or cherries, or whatever it may be, and it’s usually true—most people with a big tree aren’t using it all, or are happy to share,” says Schnaar.

“Sure, a lot of people are intimidated to knock on strangers’ doors … but I don’t have that problem. People can say no if they want to say no.”

The success rate is surprisingly high, especially because most people—especially if they live alone—can’t eat all of the fruit produced by a single tree, and Schnaar estimates about nine out of 10 people say yes to sharing their excess.

Do-it-yourself fruit processing is at the heart of The Santa Cruz Fruit Tree Project, and the community that’s been growing out of it. Most harvests are followed by a gathering that teaches how to preserve the fruit they harvest—from drying persimmons using the traditional Japanese method Hoshigaki, to fermenting the fruit into wine with local DIY winemakers. They’ve also hosted apple cider pressing parties (with a bike-powered press, of course), made vinegar and countless preserves, from marmalades to chutneys. And when there’s still too much fruit to go around, or the fruit is a little bit too mushy to give away, the chef of local restaurant India Joze often finds a culinary use for it.

The post-harvest events bring together growers, community members, and local food experts, and they’re a birthplace for lasting relationships and useful skills promoting a sustainable culture.

Schnaar’s project would have fizzled out had it not been for his devotion to it, and the whole-hearted embrace it has received from the community. Most of the fruit hosts have welcomed him and his fruit harvesters back each year, and the word is spreading. Harvests that used to see only a handful of people are now numbering dozens to even 40 or 50 people.

Read this article in its entirety, including an interview with Steve Schnaar at Shareable.

Power to the People

Why the rise of green energy makes utility companies nervous.

From the June 2015 New Yorker Magazine article by Bill McKibben

Light socket
CONSTRUCTION BY STEPHEN DOYLE / PHOTOGRAPH BY ERIC HELGAS

Mark and Sara Borkowski live with their two young daughters in a century-old, fifteen-hundred-square-foot house in Rutland, Vermont. Mark drives a school bus, and Sara works as a special-ed teacher; the cost of heating and cooling their house through the year consumes a large fraction of their combined income. Last summer, however, persuaded by Green Mountain Power, the main electric utility in Vermont, the Borkowskis decided to give their home an energy makeover. In the course of several days, coördinated teams of contractors stuffed the house with new insulation, put in a heat pump for the hot water, and installed two air-source heat pumps to warm the home. They also switched all the light bulbs to L.E.D.s and put a small solar array on the slate roof of the garage.

The Borkowskis paid for the improvements, but the utility financed the charges through their electric bill, which fell the very first month. Before the makeover, from October of 2013 to January of 2014, the Borkowskis used thirty-four hundred and eleven kilowatt-hours of electricity and three hundred and twenty-five gallons of fuel oil. From October of 2014 to January of 2015, they used twenty-eight hundred and fifty-six kilowatt-hours of electricity and no oil at all. President Obama has announced that by 2025 he wants the United States to reduce its total carbon footprint by up to twenty-eight per cent of 2005 levels. The Borkowskis reduced the footprint of their house by eighty-eight per cent in a matter of days, and at no net cost.

READ MORE
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/06/29/power-to-the-people