From the 2019 Bioneers Conference going on now…

Day 2

Today, the second day of the 2019 Bioneers Conference, was dually concentrated on climate solutions and justifiable climate despair (among many, many other ideas discussed throughout the day). Bioneers reminded us that we live in a moment of great unknowing as we face a climate future that’s unlike anything humanity has previously faced. But now is the time to harness our bravery, as Valarie Kaur observed by poignantly comparing the future we face to giving birth:

“What if the darkness in our world right now is not the darkness of the tomb but the darkness of the womb? What if our America is not dead but a country still waiting to be born? What if all of our ancestors who pushed through the fire before us, who survived genocide and colonization and slavery and assault, are standing behind us now whispering in our ears ‘You are brave’? What if this is our time of great transition?”

Following are some of the ideas and takeaways Bioneers introduced today:

ACTION ITEMS — Turn Inspiration Into Real Change

Lessons and Takeaways:

  • Women and mothers – step up to lead: Moms Clean Air Force‘s Heather McTeer Toney reminded us, “Mothers are realizing that our voices are required at this moment. It’s not an option, it’s a requirement. We belong in these rooms. Anyone who has an interest in seeing the welfare of our children through the impact of climate change belongs in these places.”
  • Empower young people and get them outside: Many speakers today mentioned a perceived hopelessness among young people in the face of existential crises. Proposed solutions included fostering closer relationships with the Earth and inviting them into the fold as we work toward climate solutions. We’re going to need everybody in this effort, said Brett KenCairn.
  • Get your money out of investments that fund pollution and destruction (divest): “Shell announced this past year that divestment had become a material risk to its business,” said author and 350.org Co-Founder Bill McKibben. Examine your investments and urge institutions to do the same. (And cut up your Chase Bank credit card.)
  • Love with these three practices: From Valarie Kaur, we must “see no stranger, tend the wound, and breathe & push.”
  • Learn about climate solutions, then share them in ways that resonate with real people: The Project Drawdown website has published its list of solutions. Heather McTeer Toney and Paul Hawken reminded us to speak in a language that your audience will absorb. “Mitigation?” Hawken said in reference to how the media covers the climate change. “Who wakes up in the morning and thinks ‘I can’t wait to go mitigate today’?” (Read an excerpt from Drawdown here.)
  • In conversations about climate resiliency, don’t just invite Indigenous People to the table: Put them at the head of the table. Panelists in this afternoon’s “Building Resilience in a Climate-Changed World” noted that Indigenous leaders have inherited ancestral knowledge that makes them especially valuable in these conversations. Listen up.
  • Tell us your stories: Are there stories Bioneers should be telling? Do you have feedback for us? Reach out! Email stories@bioneers.org or call 877.BIONEER.

Campaigns to Follow and Support:

  • Moms Clean Air Force (introduced by Heather McTeer Toney)
    • Mission: “Our mission is to protect children from air pollution and climate change. We envision a safe, stable future where all children breathe clean air.”
  • The Revolutionary Love Project (introduced by Valarie Kaur)
    • Mission: “We produce stories, tools, curricula, conferences, films, TV moments, and mass mobilizations that equip and inspire people to practice the ethic of love. Our current projects focus on racism, nationalism, and hate against Sikh, Muslim, Arab, and South Asian American communities.”
  • 350.org (introduced by Bill McKibben)
    • Mission: “We’re an international movement of ordinary people working to end the age of fossil fuels and build a world of community-led renewable energy for all.”
  • Project Drawdown (introduced by Paul Hawken)
    • Mission: “Project Drawdown is helping the world stop global warming by achieving Drawdown — as quickly, safely, and equitably as possible.”
  • SFEI Aquatic Science Center (introduced by Felicia Marcus)
    • Mission: “As sea levels continue to rise, communities will need to adapt the San Francisco Bay shoreline to create greater social, economic, and ecological resilience. A critical tool for this process is a science-based framework for developing adaptation strategies that are appropriate for the diverse shoreline of the Bay and that take advantage of natural processes. This project proposes such a framework.”
  • American Indian Child Resource Center (introduced by Erica Persons)
    • Mission: “The American Indian Child Resource Center is a non-profit social services and educational community-based organization serving American Indian community members from across the greater Oakland/San Francisco Bay Area and surrounding counties.”
  • Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (introduced by Osprey Orielle Lake)
    • Mission: “The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International is a solutions-based, multi-faceted organization established to engage women worldwide in policy advocacy, on-the-ground projects, direct action, trainings, and movement building for global climate justice.”

Drawdown Solutions: Getting Into Action Workshop

 

Help solve the

Climate Crisis!

Come explore what we can do together

Project Drawdown is a solid plan to reverse the
concentration of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere,
using proven solutions that already exist.

Come learn more about this realistic plan
and meet others in our community who are
already actively working to make a difference.

We have the means at hand!

EducateGirls
#6 Solution – Educate Girls

Drawdown Solutions:
Getting Into Action Workshop

6:00 – 8:30 pm
Monday, September 30,
and Wednesday, October 9, 16, & 23

Unitarian Universalists of Grants Pass
129 NW E St, Grants Pass, OR 97526

$20 suggested donation, or as you are able

https://SouthernOregonDrawdown.org/
RSVP: info@SouthernOregonDrawdown.org

Drawdown

What Kind of World Do You Want to Live in?

Charles Eisenstein is interviewed by Pachamama Alliance about “What kind of world do you want to live in?” and gives us a taste of what we can expect in his new book Climate: A New Story in this series of short videos:

The Core Themes of Climate: A New Story

What Kind of World Do You Want to Live in?

Our Salvation Will Come from the Margins

Signs that Humanity is Returning to Loving a Living Earth

Ask for the book at our local bookstores or read it online on Charles website: https://charleseisenstein.org/books/climate-a-new-story

Join the Sustainable Rogue Valley group Sunday Aug. 11th from 12:30 – 2:00 at the UU Fellowship Hall at 129 NW E Street, Grants Pass, OR and discover what you can do to help make your local community and our global community more resilient, regenerative and climate-friendly.

What if? — Scaling-out regenerative development glocally

1 0ypCJpuz4iR9jYbGMBtHlAEcological State: Regenerative land management practices create dramatic increases in biodiversity, water retention, and carbon sequestration. Regen Network monitors on-the-ground conditions and generates trusted attestations about the ecological state of managed land and water areas. Source: Regen Network

Building educational ecosystems of collaboration to improve planetary health

A couple of times in my life I have been thrown into deep reflection by the question “what if this was a magic wand and you could make a wish come true?”

The other day I was not asked that question, but I had a conversation with someone who is in an exceptional financial position and connected with powerful influencers. One person with the potential of being a key enabler of scaling-out capacity and action in regeneration around the globe. Yes there are many people in such positions, yet few who are so switched on to the urgency for redesigning the human impact on Earth.

Our conversation — and please don’t ask me for names at this point — was wide ranging and encouraging. It made me ask myself the big ‘What if questions’:

What if funding was no longer an issue and billions would be liberated to support the local and bioregional capacity building for ecosystems restoration and the regeneration of communities, cities, and globally cooperative bioregional economies?

What if we were suddenly enabled to convene conversations, planning and implementation locally and bioregionally to engage in the scale-linking redesign of the human presence and impact on Earth?

What if we were challenged to scale-out a glocal (global-local) capacity building and education programme that enables people to learn the needed skills and knowledge while already being an active part of the regeneration rising?

What if all of the experienced organizations, teachers, businesses that hold important skills and experience to contribute to this process where suddenly asked to collaborate in building the capacity of many millions of people to get involved and become active healers of the Earth and her people?

In the conversation I was asked whether I had a solution to the converging global crises and an idea how to create a wise response to them. My response was that anyone who claimed he had might be deluded at worst and at the least lacking the necessary humility to match the intensity of the challenges we face.

We will have to find those answers and solutions together. And to do so we need a shared overall vision and get started so we can learn along the way.

We also have to understand that this will be a continuous learning journey that will need many adjustment of course and constant redesign to adjust answers and solutions to changing conditions.

As I mentioned before, maybe questions rather than answers are the appropriate cultural guidance system — or ‘deep code’ ;-) — in this situation?

That said, we do know that bringing carbon back home, restoring healthy ecosystems functions, cleaning up the oceans and restoring watersheds, reforesting the planet rapidly with biodiversity reserves, productive analogue forests that provide food and biomaterials, creating healthy agro-ecological ecosystems in which farming is also about healing landscapes and safe-guarding biodiversity, building capacity for decentralized renewable energy production and catalyzing the massive amount of innovation that will be needed to shift towards regionally focussed circular biomaterials-economies and regionalized production and consumption patterns … all of these activities will take us into the right direction.

What is more, engaging in all these activities as and in community will provide a shared context of meaning locally, regionally and globally that might just take us into celebrating our diversity of opinions and finding a higher ground on which we can collaborate in the healing of the Earth and her people.

We need to find this higher ground to see our diversity as a source of vitality, resilience and creativity, rather than a reason to argue, go to war, dismiss and compete.

So what if the money was suddenly available to engage everyone who is holding pieces in the complex puzzle of redesigning and transforming the human impact on Earth in a concerted effort to enable this shift through education, community organizing, multi-sector/stakeholder regional visioning and planning processes, and enabling platforms and processes for glocal collaboration, knowledge exchange along with established pathways for flowing financial capital into living capital?

Are we ready? We better be!

Too often have I seen organizations that are broadly aligned on their higher vision and mission fall into patterns of behaviour that were more competitive rather than collaborative. Budget constraint made people more concerned with keeping their individual organizations functioning — rightly convinced of the importance of their contribution to positive change. It stopped them from feeling able to dedicate time and space to the exploration of how to link up with other players in the field and create synergies that would lead to all agents of positive change working in a concerted effort. This pattern could sabotage an effective scale-out regenerative literacy, capacity and implementation.

What if we no longer had the excuse to on the one hand admit that wider cooperation and whole systems design processes linking diverse efforts into a whole that is more than the sum of its parts are necessary and on the other hand justify inaction by saying that we don’t have the funding for it?

Imagine convening a series of meetings that would explore what needs to be done to skill-up and build capacity for ecosystems restoration and regenerative development everywhere.

Can we create a list of skilled agroforestry, regenerative agriculture, permaculture design and holistic land management professionals, of analogue foresters and biodiversity experts for every locality, region and biome? So we know who to call on as trainers.

Can we create an ecosystem of training and education opportunities that are taking place in existing projects, rapidly spreading ‘ecosystems restoration camps’, and the growing network of Regenerative Regional Development Hubs? So people who want to become active change agents know their options.

Can we link the different permaculture associations, agroforestry training centres, organic and biodynamic farming schools, demonstration sites and large implementation project of holistic management and diverse regenerative agriculture approaches into a global networks that trains people on the job? So we can begin to make progress while we scale-out capacity.

Can we establish multi-sector partnerships that link business, public authorities and civil society organizations into bioregionally focussed collaboration in regenerative development plans and implementation? So we can coordinate efforts that draw on our diversity of skills and experiences in ways that truly enable change.

Can we build the appropriate platforms to enable knowledge exchange, skill sharing, and capacity building through local, regional and global collaboration? So we can co-create a more regenerative and thriving future for all of humanity and the whole community of life (as a planetary process).

I will resist the temptation to continue as pieces that take more than 5 minutes to read don’t get a lot of attention. Below is a 11 minute rant to myself on my SUP board that explores the big What if even further. I sense soon there will be a lot of funding flowing into restoration and regenerative development. How do we make sure we are ready to scale-out when that time comes?

“We may not be able to raise the winds, but we can set sails so that when the wind comes we are ready.”

— E.F. Schumacher

11 minute rant on my SUP board exploring the ideas in this post further

For a map of converging efforts in regenerative development, ecosystems restoration, resilience building and improving planetary health, see this list of resources and the dynamic ecosystems map at the end of this article on ‘Planetary Health and Regeneration’.

Daniel Christian Wahl — Catalyzing transformative innovation in the face of converging crises, advising on regenerative whole systems design, regenerative leadership, and education for regenerative development and bioregional regeneration.

Author of the internationally acclaimed book Designing Regenerative Cultures

Twitter: @DrDCWahl

Medium: Blog with more than 280 articles

Facebook: RegenerativeCultures and Ecological Consciousness

View at Medium.com

Sustainable Rogue Valley becomes an Ally to Southern Oregon Climate Action Now

SOCAN-logo-300x126

Southern Oregon Climate Action Now

is a grassroots, volunteer, non-profit organization of area residents who care about climate change and have joined forces to take bold action against it. Through volunteer projects, we focus on reducing the impacts of Global Warming across Southern Oregon.

Our Mission

Recognizing the urgent need for bold action, SOCAN’s mission is to promote awareness and understanding about the causes and consequences of climate change, to develop solutions, and to motivate concerned citizens to take individual and collective action.

Our Goal

We seek a reduction in the global atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration to 350 parts per million (Carbon dioxide equivalent: CO2e). To achieve this, we collaborate with individuals and organizations throughout the world and encourage both personal and governmental actions that reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Pachamama Alliance “Drawdown Solutions: Getting into Action!” course.

Sign up for the next offering of the 4-session Pachamama Alliance “Drawdown Solutions: Getting into Action!” course. It will run Thursday evenings, July 19 & 26, and August 2 & 9, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m., in the Casbah Tent, at Jackson Wellsprings  –  2253 Highway 99, Ashland, 97520, OR, United States .

Pre-requisite for this course is attendance at an “Introduction to Drawdown” event–next one scheduled in our area is July 5, same time and same place as this course.

DD Wellsprings July2018